Specific CD8 T Cell States May Indicate Response to Immune Checkpoint Therapy for Melanoma

A multi-institutional research team, led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has identified specific states of cytotoxic CD8 T cells that are associated with patient response to checkpoint immunotherapy for melanoma. Their report published in the journal Cellalso identifies specific...

A multi-institutional research team, led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, has identified specific states of cytotoxic CD8 T cells that are associated with patient response to checkpoint immunotherapy for melanoma. Their report published in the journal Cellalso identifies specific marker proteins associated with these cell states, providing data that could help better understand why checkpoint therapy – which enables the immune system to attack cancerous tumors – doesn’t work for all patients and may enable the development of tests to help predict which patients may be helped by the approach. A companion immunotherapy study, led by a separate research team from the Broad Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, appears in the same issue of Cell.

“Checkpoint inhibition therapies have completely changed the way patients with metastatic melanoma are being treated clinically today, and since they were first approved in 2011 they have given new hope to patients who otherwise would have very poor prognosis – an average survival of under a year – and few therapeutic options,” says Nir Hacohen, PhD, director of the Center for Cancer Immunology in the MGH Center for Cancer Research, co-director of the Cell Circuits

Source: aggregator.leafscience.org